Society News

  • e-Posters coming to 2016 JAM - Posters at the 2016 Joint Annual Meeting are going electronic! Here is some information to help you get acquainted with this technology.
  • Virtual Meeting returning to 2016 JAM - We are bringing back the Virtual Meeting after amazing success at the 2014 Joint Annual Meeting and at the 2013, 2014 and 2015 Midwest meetings!
  • JAS update - Time to publication for the September 2015 issue will be 5.8 months -- the shortest time to publication in the journal’s history!

Get Involved

  • JrAS_icon

    Kids are heading back to school. What a perfect time to help support animal science education in the classroom! Order a subscription to Jr. Animal Scientist for a classroom in your local elementary school. Learn more about sponsoring or enrolling your kids here

  • ePoster

    Say goodbye to lugging giant posters through the airport. Say goodbye to big spending at the printers! Posters at the 2016 Joint Annual Meeting are going electronic. Read More
    Say goodbye to trying to quickly scribble all the information from a talk into the margins of an abstract. We are bringing back the Virtual Meeting after amazing success at the 2014 JAM and at the 2013, 2014 and 2015 Midwest meetings! Read More



Public Policy

Pierce Bennett: D.C. Summer Policy Intern - Bennett is one of the four students chosen to spend the summer in Washington, D.C. as an ASAS Science Policy Intern. READ MORE...

Interpretive Summaries

  • Pain management during surgical castration of beef bulls

    A recent study reported in the Journal of Animal Science examines the effect of meloxicam administration at surgical castration on the inflammatory response of 30 crossbred beef bulls. 

  • Researchers study tall larkspur toxicity in cattle

    In the western foothills and mountain rangelands of the U.S., wild larkspurs (Delphinium spp.) are a major cause of cattle losses. Researchers determined the amount of tall larkspur that a 1,100-pound steer could consume without becoming poisoned.

  • Fat to become sixth taste?

    Oleogustus — That’s the name scientists at Purdue University are proposing for a new sixth taste: fat. In coming years, fat could join sweet, sour, salty, bitter, and umami to describe tastes.